Browsing by Category: Food & Wine

SAV_15_SBA_LOGO_final

Parla Food is a finalist in Saveur’s Best Culinary Travel blog category and I am so thrilled to be nominated again! It would be delightful if you would take a moment to vote for Parla Food and, while you’re on Saveur.com, check out the other cool blogs in 13 categories. Voting is open through April 30th, so won’t you take a little time out of your day to cast your ballot? Pretty please with pecorino on top?

Photo 28-02-15 23 02 48

Under normal circumstances I would never write this: you should go to Caffè Propaganda. (Not for the food. Never for the food.) The place is appealing in a Keith McNally kinda way, I guess. But Propaganda is not in NYC’s Meatpacking District or Soho where a wannabe French bistro for the beautiful people makes (more…)

Easter Sunday and Monday, April 5 and 6, are just around the corner. I can almost smell the whole lamb roasting away in the oven. If you are visiting Rome during Easter and aren’t able to partake in the traditional Easter lamb feast in someone’s home, don’t fret! There are some delicious places that will be open on Easter Sunday as well as Easter Monday, which is also a holiday. Tables are in high demand so be sure to make your dining arrangements ASAP. Here’s where to eat: (more…)

pajata

Offal lovers of the world rejoice! Yesterday, the European Union lifted a 14-year ban prohibiting the sale of veal pajata (the intestines of suckling calves) and other internal bovine organs, a prohibition passed in the wake of Mad Cow Disease. Rigatoni co la pajata (veal intestines cooked with tomato sauce and served with rigatoni and Pecorino Romano) and pajata alla piastra (seared intestines) were always available from butchers on the black market and some restaurants served them in violation of the law. But for the past decade and a half, most of the pajata served in Roman trattorias came from lambs rather than the traditional veal.

pajata

Veal and lamb pajata is similar enough; the upper intestines of the suckling animal is tied off and cooked, allowing the mother’s milk to curdle and cook inside the casing. The result is a sort of ricotta-like filling. The absolute best places in town to try this fabulous Roman delicacy (which is in season in the spring when the intestines are small and tender) are Armando Al Pantheon, Cesare al Casaletto, and Flavio al Velavevodetto.

pajata-rome

Regoli Cafe Rome

If I were a traffic cop tasked with raising Rome’s revenue, I would camp out in front of Pasticceria Regoli, a pastry shop in the city’s Esquiline district. For nearly a century, the Regoli family has been baking and serving seasonal sweets and cream-filled pastries, attracting Rome dwellers from all over the city who today flagrantly double park in front of the small storefront on Via dello Statuto. Regoli’s maritozzi (sweet buns filled with whipped cream), bavaresi, crostate (jam tarts) and torte di fragoline (cake with chantilly cream and wild strawberries) are well worth a ticket (though none are written). The block-traffic-with-your-illegal-parking-to-leisurely-buy-pastries ritual is a fact of Roman life that rarely goes punished. In Regoli’s case, the rewards are beautiful sweets made with traditional recipes even older than the shop’s throwback interior design.

The traffic situation intensified recently when Regoli opened a second location, a café, next door. Finally, Rome’s sweet tooths have a place in which to immediately devour these famous and flawless pastries, other than a parked car, that is.