Browsing by Category: Gastronomic Traditions

As far back as the 2nd century B.C.E., Jews have made their home in Rome and represent the oldest Jewish community in the world outside Israel. What we recognize today as Roman Jewish cooking is fruit of universal Jewish dietary guidelines and, perhaps most importantly, the community’s forced isolation into a gated ghetto for 300 years, which resulted in a unique spin on traditional Italian and Jewish cuisine, using what limited ingredients were available. Additionally, the cuisine reflects many outsider influences—result of the Jewish diaspora of the 15th century as direct result of the Spanish Inquisition, and again in the 1960s when thousands of Jews fleeing Libya settled in Rome.

ventricina-1

Grossolana. The word has a ring to it in Italian that it could only dream of in its English incarnation (in which it translates as “coarse”). Say it with me: grossssssolana! Few words are so fun to say and I can’t help but think that this linguistic affection contributes to my love of ventricina del Vastese (more…)

rome_snow_winter

UPDATED FOR 2014! There is a widely held misconception that during the Christmas and New Year’s holidays, Rome’s restaurants shut down and people who don’t have the luxury of eating at home are left to scavenge for food (more…)

IMG_1076

Waaaay back in December 2012, I wrote a post in which I put Flavio al Velavevodetto (and few other places) on notice. That year, Flavio, a Testaccio-based restaurant specializing in traditional Roman fare, had gone from being (more…)

paccheri enoteca provincia romana

When Enoteca Provincia Romana opened four years ago just off Piazza Venezia, local guides rejoiced. Finally, there was a place near the Roman Forum where one could go for a decent meal, plus it offered a view of Trajan’s Column and the Altare della Patria to boot. The food was good, but not flawless, and the place rarely (more…)