Browsing by Category: Travel

As far back as the 2nd century B.C.E., Jews have made their home in Rome and represent the oldest Jewish community in the world outside Israel. What we recognize today as Roman Jewish cooking is fruit of universal Jewish dietary guidelines and, perhaps most importantly, the community’s forced isolation into a gated ghetto for 300 years, which resulted in a unique spin on traditional Italian and Jewish cuisine, using what limited ingredients were available. Additionally, the cuisine reflects many outsider influences—result of the Jewish diaspora of the 15th century as direct result of the Spanish Inquisition, and again in the 1960s when thousands of Jews fleeing Libya settled in Rome.

Rumeli Hisari
Rumeli Hisarı, an Ottoman fortress, is the gateway to the Upper Bosphorus.

Even for a city that straddles two continents, Istanbul is packed. Depending on who’s counting, Turkey’s cultural capital is home to 14 to 20 million, a staggering range by any count. To accommodate the booming population, the city’s environs have been transformed and deforested — and the pastoral life that once (more…)

Piramide
The Pyramid of Gaius Cestius is just one of many recently refurbished monuments in Rome.

Undecided on where to go on holiday on this year? May I suggest Rome? The Italian capital is No. 48 on the NYT Travel’s list of desirable destinations for 2015. In addition to the city’s natural appeal, the Domus Aurea has reopened (at least until March, that is), the Pyramid of Gaius Cestius has been refurbished, and Augustan sites continue to celebrate the 2,000th anniversary of the first Emperor’s death. Read more online here or in this weekend’s NYT Travel section and I hope to see you in Rome in 2015!

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I am so excited to be included in the annual Imbibe 75 Issue: The People, Places & Flavors Shaping the Drinks World! Pick up the Jan/Feb issue of Imbibe Magazine (on newsstands now) or follow this link for a peek. You can find my 24 hour guide to Rome online here.

ventricina-1

Grossolana. The word has a ring to it in Italian that it could only dream of in its English incarnation (in which it translates as “coarse”). Say it with me: grossssssolana! Few words are so fun to say and I can’t help but think that this linguistic affection contributes to my love of ventricina del Vastese (more…)